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Questions About Natural Products

Feverfew For Type O Wife with Migraine


QUESTION

My wife is type O. She suffers from migraine, to the extent that she vomits for 3 days continuously. Doctors can't help. We have removed the foods from her diet in your book, and she seems to be better. She frequently feels nausea. What else can we do? Thanks for your book, it is a godsend!


ANSWER

Your wife may want to investigate the use of the herb Feverfew, especially since its best effects have been reported for the types of migraine specifically hallmarked by nausea.

Feverfew is a common-or-garden herb which has grown unwanted in many people's gardens; but has been commercially cultivated during the past fifteen years. It is a member of the Compositae or Daisy family; and is sometimes known as Chrysanthemum Parthenium or more correctly Tanacetum Parthenium. It is a perennial plant, growing to a height of between 14 and 45 cms, with light-green feather-like leaves which are aromatic but bitter to taste. Its pretty daisy-like flowers are yellow at the center with white outer petals.

Canada's Health Protection Branch recognizes feverfew as a nonprescription drug for preventing migraines and reducing the nausea and vomiting that sometimes accompanies them. In Canada, standardized doses of dried leaves are sold over the counter. A review of the literature concluded that the herb was safe and effective, although I would not recommend its use in nursing women or children.

In a study of 24 patients (women 19-61 years old), the researchers reported significant reduction of Migraine Index in 8 patients, less significant in additional 5. Our results confirm that feverfew may be beneficial in migraine prophylaxis as an additive drug.

Many, many feverfew preparations are available, however, the best results appear to be from using the leaves as a tea, versus the concentrates or standardized forms since there is some doubt that the actual active ingredient has been identified.




The Ask Dr. D'Adamo internet advice column ran from 1996 to 2009, at which time Dr. D'Adamo's teaching and programming responsibilities no longer allowed him to devote time and resources to directly answering visitor questions. However we've recently reorganized this treasure-trove of material and made it again available to his readership. He occasionally posts new entries. These are marked with a NEW tag.



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FUCUS PLUS


Many sea vegetables, and in particular bladderwrack, have many unique characteristics and properties and are used extensively as food in coastal cuisines around the world.

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