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Type O with Diabetes and Diverticulosis


QUESTION

I am an American Indian, Type II diabetic, type 0, with diverticulosis which has caused severe constipation over the last six months. Nothing has helped.I bought you first book this week read it. No mention of what might help. I am desperate for relief. Please help me become a regular guy again. Thanks!!


ANSWER

Many people have small pouches in their colons that bulge outward through weak spots, like an inner tube that pokes through weak places in a tire. Each pouch is called a diverticulum. Pouches (plural) are called diverticula. The condition of having diverticula is called diverticulosis. About half of all Americans age 60 to 80, and almost everyone over age 80, have diverticulosis.

Though not proven, the dominant theory is that a low-fiber diet is the main cause of diverticular disease. The disease was first noticed in the United States in the early 1900s. At about the same time, processed foods were introduced to the American diet.

In general, following the type O diet, with emphasis on lots of beneficial fruits and vegetables, plus lean meats, can help regulate bowel function, especially if you make it part of a program that includes regular exercise.

Insoluble fiber binds water, making stools softer and bulkier. Therefore, fiber, especially that found in whole grain products, is helpful in the treatment and prevention of constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. Diverticula are pouches of the intestinal wall that can become inflamed and painful. In the past, a low-fiber diet was prescribed for this condition. It is now known that a high-fiber diet gives better results once the inflammation has subsided. A fine form of fiber is arabinogalactan derived from the larch tree. Because it is both soluble and insoluble it has more utility in diverticulosis, since exclusively insoluble forms of fiber can aggravate inflammation of the diverticula.

For some Type 2 diabetics, diet and exercise are usually sufficient to keep the disease under control, however you must see your doctor regularly and if you have any change of symptoms. Supplementing the diet with fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds has been shown in clinical and experimental studies to reduce blood glucose and insulin levels while also lowering blood cholesterol. Adding several helpings of mushrooms to the diet may also help with managing type II diabetes, if the are allowable for your type. Finally, supplementing with the anti-oxidant flavones quercetin or rutin may help control diabetic complications in some individuals.




The Ask Dr. D'Adamo internet advice column ran from 1996 to 2009, at which time Dr. D'Adamo's teaching and programming responsibilities no longer allowed him to devote time and resources to directly answering visitor questions. However we've recently reorganized this treasure-trove of material and made it again available to his readership. He occasionally posts new entries. These are marked with a NEW tag.



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SPOTLIGHT

DEFLECT LECTIN BLOCKER


When you have your 'cheat' moments on the diet, whether they are intentional treats for yourself or an unexpected slip-up, Deflect can combat the negative lectins that harm your body.

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