Ask Dr. D'Adamo

Ask Dr. D'Adamo Index    |     Latest Entry    |     Pull a Random Question

Questions About Specific Health Issues

Husband with Muscle Spasms


QUESTION

Could you help? My husband has had muscle spasms, continuously, for several months now. They don't allow him to led even a partially normal life. He can't sit for more than 45 minutes before his back swells up and he is in continuous pain. We've been following your advice for about two weeks and no change. Thank you.


ANSWER

Although you did not leave your husband's blood type, two recommendations can be given that are reasonably effective, rational and safe:

1. Magnesium. 500mg of supplemental magnesium taken every 3-4 hours can help, (1) especially if your husband is one of the many individuals with back spasm who tend towards magnesium deficiency.

2. GABA or gamma amino butyric acid, is an inhibitory neurotransmitter - a chemical involved in nerve regulation which serves to inhibit excessive bioelectrical activity. GABA is the prime inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. It is a derivative of the amino acid glutamic acid and is related to the sleep-enhancing biochemical Gamma Hydroxy Butyrate. The function of GABA is to decrease neuron activity and inhibit nerve cells from overfiring. Together with other chemicals, GABA prevents anxiety and stress-related messages from reaching the motor centers of the brain by occupying the receptor sites for these messages. (2) GABA brings to the source what nerves need to stay calm. The nutrient GABA can be taken to calm the body in much the same way as these pharmaceuticals but without the fear of addiction. Supplemental GABA can quiet anxiety and reduce muscle tensions. Typical doses are 250-750mg daily. Avoid higher doses.

1. Rossier P, van Erven S, Wade DT. CLINICAL CORRESPONDENCE: the effect of magnesium oral therapy on spasticity in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Eur J Neurol. 2000 Nov;7(6):741-4.

2. Waagepetersen HS, Sonnewald U, Schousboe A. The GABA paradox: multiple roles as metabolite, neurotransmitter, and neurodifferentiative agent. J Neurochem 1999;73:1335- 42.




The Ask Dr. D'Adamo internet advice column ran from 1996 to 2009, at which time Dr. D'Adamo's teaching and programming responsibilities no longer allowed him to devote time and resources to directly answering visitor questions. However we've recently reorganized this treasure-trove of material and made it again available to his readership. He occasionally posts new entries. These are marked with a NEW tag.



facebook share    Tweet This!


SPOTLIGHT

EAT RIGHT FOR YOUR TYPE


This completely revised and updated 20th Anniversary edition of EAT RIGHT 4 YOUR TYPE makes this worldwide phenomenon even more accessible.

Click to learn more



The statements made on our websites have not been evaluated by the FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration).
Our products and services are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician.
Copyright © 2015-2020, Hoop-A-Joop, LLC, Inc. All Rights Reserved.     Log In